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Forenci 09-22-2012 02:47 AM

The Teachers Thread
 
I've wanted to start this for a while, since I know there are a lot of teachers that post here, as well as a lot of us who are going to be teachers some day soon.

I'm currently getting my masters in English, and I will be getting my masters in teaching too.

I can't wait to teach, personally. I know I won't ever get paid very much being in South Carolina and I know it's probably not the most glamours job but it's something I am really looking forward to.

I'm pretty hopeful that getting a good job at a good school won't be too hard. I've got a pretty good resume, and I will have three degrees (technically four because I double-majored but it's a fairly worthless degree). My bachelors is in journalism and I minored in history, my masters will be in English and Teaching.

Hopefully that will give me a lot of opportunities for jobs. I feel like I could teach history, English, or any kind of journalism classes that a high school might have.

My biggest worry is lesson planning. As I have yet to take any education classes, I'm nervous about writing lesson plans. Is there any tips to making sure your lesson plans take up the entire class period? That's my biggest fear. Does the school give you a lot of things you have to do and you just sort of fill in the lesson plans with that or is more of a mix of that and your own ideas?

Brent 09-22-2012 08:05 AM

Not to scare you, but having no experience, all those degrees don't mean much as far as preparation. We just hired this girl at my school who majored in secondary education and, while she seems somewhat prepared, you can tell she's struggling to keep her head above water.

What I can say is that if you want to be a successful English teacher, start reading books by Jim Burke, Penny Kittle, How to Read Literature Like a Professor, and if your school will pay for it, AP conferences usually have great presenters.

Caddy 09-22-2012 08:08 AM

Over under 24 months before Forenci gets arrested for sexual relations with a female student.

Giantsfan1080 09-22-2012 09:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Caddy (Post 3123931)
Over under 24 months before Forenci gets arrested for sexual relations with a female student.

If it were a male student I would have took the under.

Caddy 09-22-2012 09:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Giantsfan1080 (Post 3123943)
If it were a male student I would have took the under.


scottyboy 09-22-2012 10:00 AM

yeah, lesson planning is the main thing i'm not looking forward to. I start my practicum next semester and this time next year I'll be student teaching which is REALLY weird to think about...

CJSchneider 09-22-2012 10:58 AM

I will enjoy this thread so much.

Forenci, when you say you plan on a masters in "teaching", know that your statement indicates a lack of understanding of what you may be trying to get yourself into. You obtain a Masters in "Education", not "teaching", and even then, that field has many branches. There is a Masters Degree of General Education, Master degree in specific fields such as P.E., Adaptive P.E., Special Education Services, Masters degree of Supervision and /or Administration (some universities have these as different fields and some states will only accept one or the other to qualify for administrative positions), Masters degree of Educational Technology. The list even goes on.

Now, for as much as I applaud you on the number of degrees you will have obtained, I suggest you check with your school of choice as to what your course work will consist of seeing as you will be attempting a Masters of Education without first having earned a Bachelors degree in Education. I say this as the laws in many states require you to acquire a degree or certification to teach before obtaining a masters. Remember a Masters in an educational field is not where you learn how to teach; that is done during your graduate degree course work.

The_Dude 09-22-2012 12:55 PM

Also know that degrees may look good on a resume, but nothing looks better than experience. There are a ****-ton of applicants with multiple &/or graduate degrees. You need something that sets your resume apart from the others.

Volunteer as a tutor or work in an after school program. Really look for work/experience with Special Ed students. See if you can get a temporary license & work as a substitute or a summer school program. Will it be difficult to do this while in school? absolutely. But it will make a big difference when looking for a job. Classroom observations & student teaching are not enough.... everybody has to do them.

Another thing that can look better on paper than just a degree is a bunch of Special ed credits. Take sped classes that aren't required courses. Work in some sort of special ed license if you are willing/able to make your degree a double major. It is really what people are looking for. To be honest, you may have to work in a Special Ed setting to get the experience needed to get a general ed job. That's what i had to do to get a Social Studies job, anyway.

When i was interviewed/hired for my job (a .67 position at the time), there were nearly 200 applicants & only 15 interviews conducted. My experience as a paraprofessional & Special ed teacher brought my resume to the top of the heap. You have to have something that makes them want to learn more about you. Great grades & degrees are not enough. Get the interview first, then knock it out of the park.

Brent 09-22-2012 12:57 PM

Also, if you can, do your student teaching at a school that isn't in "the nicest part of town," so to speak. Having only worked in well-to-do classrooms in my career means that I am not exactly the best candidate for those types of schools, which is regrettable to an extent.

Cigaro 09-22-2012 01:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Forenci (Post 3123901)
I've wanted to start this for a while, since I know there are a lot of teachers that post here, as well as a lot of us who are going to be teachers some day soon.

I'm currently getting my masters in English, and I will be getting my masters in teaching too.

I can't wait to teach, personally. I know I won't ever get paid very much being in South Carolina and I know it's probably not the most glamours job but it's something I am really looking forward to.

I'm pretty hopeful that getting a good job at a good school won't be too hard. I've got a pretty good resume, and I will have three degrees (technically four because I double-majored but it's a fairly worthless degree). My bachelors is in journalism and I minored in history, my masters will be in English and Teaching.

Hopefully that will give me a lot of opportunities for jobs. I feel like I could teach history, English, or any kind of journalism classes that a high school might have.

My biggest worry is lesson planning. As I have yet to take any education classes, I'm nervous about writing lesson plans. Is there any tips to making sure your lesson plans take up the entire class period? That's my biggest fear. Does the school give you a lot of things you have to do and you just sort of fill in the lesson plans with that or is more of a mix of that and your own ideas?

Where do you plan to teach?

scottyboy 09-22-2012 01:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brent (Post 3124058)
Also, if you can, do your student teaching at a school that isn't in "the nicest part of town," so to speak. Having only worked in well-to-do classrooms in my career means that I am not exactly the best candidate for those types of schools, which is regrettable to an extent.

see, I plan on applying to Rutgers Urban Fellowship program which will have me to my observations and student teachings in an urban area, which I think would be a plus. Being a dude and working in urban areas, I feel, can only be a plus for me.

I also wanna know how I can get into coaching. I want to teach middle school and coach high school basketball, not sure how realistic that is

A Perfect Score 09-22-2012 01:34 PM

Hey, I can actually contribute here!

I'm currently working through my Masters in English as well, and I've got a T.A (Teaching Assistant) position that goes along with it, so I'm actually doing alot of teaching/marking/lecturing at the moment. I'm planning a lecture right now on postmodernism!

Forenci 09-22-2012 01:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brent (Post 3124058)
Also, if you can, do your student teaching at a school that isn't in "the nicest part of town," so to speak. Having only worked in well-to-do classrooms in my career means that I am not exactly the best candidate for those types of schools, which is regrettable to an extent.

Yeah, I've done some volunteer work at schools and had field experiences at quite a few less than stellar schools. I've enjoyed it a lot though.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cigaro (Post 3124067)
Where do you plan to teach?

Probably in the Richland 2 District. At least, that's what I'm hoping for.

Quote:

Originally Posted by CJSchneider (Post 3123986)
I will enjoy this thread so much.

Forenci, when you say you plan on a masters in "teaching", know that your statement indicates a lack of understanding of what you may be trying to get yourself into. You obtain a Masters in "Education", not "teaching", and even then, that field has many branches. There is a Masters Degree of General Education, Master degree in specific fields such as P.E., Adaptive P.E., Special Education Services, Masters degree of Supervision and /or Administration (some universities have these as different fields and some states will only accept one or the other to qualify for administrative positions), Masters degree of Educational Technology. The list even goes on.

Now, for as much as I applaud you on the number of degrees you will have obtained, I suggest you check with your school of choice as to what your course work will consist of seeing as you will be attempting a Masters of Education without first having earned a Bachelors degree in Education. I say this as the laws in many states require you to acquire a degree or certification to teach before obtaining a masters. Remember a Masters in an educational field is not where you learn how to teach; that is done during your graduate degree course work.

Say what now? I AM getting a Masters in Arts in Teaching, (commonly just referred to to as a Masters in Teaching, here).

[ur]http://www.winthrop.edu/graduateschool/default.aspx?id=3615[/url]

I am fully aware of the differences between a Masters in Education and a Masters in Teaching. I've been planning this for quite a while and I'm pretty much already admitted to the program because I've meet all the course requirements for the program, as well as passed the Praxis II. It doesn't require you to have any prior education courses. A lot of people do it as a five year program, getting their undergrad in English/History/whatever and then doing the one year program to teach. My circumstances are a little different, but I am still able to get the degree.

And I have also done quite a bit of things to help bolster my teaching resume. I've volunteered and had field experiences at high risk after school programs, like a homework clinic for at risk kids. Not to mention the mandatory internship and field experiences that comes with getting a MAT degree at Winthrop. Winthrop is one of the best in the country for getting involved in education, which is why I chose it.

And I apologize, I wasn't attempting to brag in any shape or form, if that's what it sounded like (I feel like that's how it came off). I was merely mentioning the degrees I had to see if you guys thought it opened up some more options for teaching. Like with my minor in history, I wasn't sure if they would allow for me to teach history classes.

CJSchneider 09-22-2012 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scottyboy (Post 3124080)
see, I plan on applying to Rutgers Urban Fellowship program which will have me to my observations and student teachings in an urban area, which I think would be a plus. Being a dude and working in urban areas, I feel, can only be a plus for me.

I also wanna know how I can get into coaching. I want to teach middle school and coach high school basketball, not sure how realistic that is

Pretty realistic, actually.

Districts have a pay scale for coaches (send me an e-mail address and I can send you a copy of the one my parish uses), but the tough part is finding an "in". Most schools are only allowed to pay a set number of coaches for all sports and those slots get grabbed up pretty quick. For example, my school can pay a total of 5 coaches, not including the Athletic Coordinator, yet we have six sports (Football, softball, boys basketball, girls basketball, boys track, girls track), plus assistants to football and basketball. What it translates to in many schools is that you had better be prepared to be a head coach of one sport and an assistant to at least one other.
By law at the middle school level in public schools, teachers are given first shot at coaching positions (to be honest, it is rare that a non-teacher/school board employee even attempts to be a coach - I can expand on that if you'd like.)

Raiderz4Life 09-22-2012 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CJSchneider (Post 3124099)
Pretty realistic, actually.

Districts have a pay scale for coaches (send me an e-mail address and I can send you a copy of the one my parish uses), but the tough part is finding an "in". Most schools are only allowed to pay a set number of coaches for all sports and those slots get grabbed up pretty quick. For example, my school can pay a total of 5 coaches, not including the Athletic Coordinator, yet we have six sports (Football, softball, boys basketball, girls basketball, boys track, girls track), plus assistants to football and basketball. What it translates to in many schools is that you had better be prepared to be a head coach of one sport and an assistant to at least one other.
By law at the middle school level in public schools, teachers are given first shot at coaching positions (to be honest, it is rare that a non-teacher/school board employee even attempts to be a coach - I can expand on that if you'd like.)

So that explains why my LB coach was also the basketball JV HC....fkin Vigil...no foul was ever his fault hahaha

scottyboy 09-22-2012 02:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CJSchneider (Post 3124099)
Pretty realistic, actually.

Districts have a pay scale for coaches (send me an e-mail address and I can send you a copy of the one my parish uses), but the tough part is finding an "in". Most schools are only allowed to pay a set number of coaches for all sports and those slots get grabbed up pretty quick. For example, my school can pay a total of 5 coaches, not including the Athletic Coordinator, yet we have six sports (Football, softball, boys basketball, girls basketball, boys track, girls track), plus assistants to football and basketball. What it translates to in many schools is that you had better be prepared to be a head coach of one sport and an assistant to at least one other.
By law at the middle school level in public schools, teachers are given first shot at coaching positions (to be honest, it is rare that a non-teacher/school board employee even attempts to be a coach - I can expand on that if you'd like.)

I enjoy hearing this, I just heard somewhere that you had to teach at the school you work at to coach there, and quite frankly, I don't want to teach high school. If I could teach at the middle school and be the high school basketball coach, that'd be a dream come true really. Hell, I can assist on volleyball and lacrosse if need be, and I'd like to think I know enough about football to even be an assistant there even without playing experience.

Getting an "in" seems to always be the tough part nowadays. I'm actually going to go back to my old schools and see if I can assist the coaches with any sport, just to bolster my resume hopefully.

CJSchneider 09-22-2012 02:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Forenci (Post 3124093)

Say what now? I AM getting a Masters in Arts in Teaching, (commonly just referred to to as a Masters in Teaching, here).

[ur]http://www.winthrop.edu/graduateschool/default.aspx?id=3615[/url]

I am fully aware of the differences between a Masters in Education and a Masters in Teaching.

I didn't take it as bragging since it was pertinent to the discussion.
After looking at that site, and the way that system is set up, as I see it, the MAT is the course work you would acquire if you had acquired a Bachelors of Arts in Edu.

I admit, I may be a bit on the defensive on this subject as well. I have met far too many people who fast track them selves to a Masters in Edu. (Administration), then think they are better than me (a teacher with 11 years experience, certified in 4 subjects (PE, computer literacy, math and english), serves as a committee chair of a state mandated SWPB committee, on the SBLC and school improvement committee, and the athletic coordinator). By the way that is just this year alone.

Oh, also on a side note, due to enrollment numbers, they took my sports journalism class away and give me 5 classes of PE (it actually allows them to accommodate more students during the same amount of time) So now I teach two classes of robotics and 5 classes of PE. The cool part is that I can now where tennis-shoes to school.

kalbears13 09-22-2012 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brent (Post 3124058)
Also, if you can, do your student teaching at a school that isn't in "the nicest part of town," so to speak. Having only worked in well-to-do classrooms in my career means that I am not exactly the best candidate for those types of schools, which is regrettable to an extent.

At least you have your health.

CJSchneider 09-22-2012 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scottyboy (Post 3124117)
I enjoy hearing this, I just heard somewhere that you had to teach at the school you work at to coach there, and quite frankly, I don't want to teach high school. If I could teach at the middle school and be the high school basketball coach, that'd be a dream come true really. Hell, I can assist on volleyball and lacrosse if need be, and I'd like to think I know enough about football to even be an assistant there even without playing experience.

Getting an "in" seems to always be the tough part nowadays. I'm actually going to go back to my old schools and see if I can assist the coaches with any sport, just to bolster my resume hopefully.


I know here where I teach, there is nothing that says you can't teach at one school and coach at another. Last year a teacher down the hall from me was the Head coach of another school's football team (Yes, it was awkward and he got the hint and transferred - After we beat him mind you.) This year, one of my friends who teaches math is a HS DB coach, then in the winter, he is our girls Basketball head coach.

Raiderz4Life 09-22-2012 02:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CJSchneider (Post 3124130)
Oh, also on a side note, due to enrollment numbers, they took my sports journalism class away and give me 5 classes of PE (it actually allows them to accommodate more students during the same amount of time) So now I teach two classes of robotics and 5 classes of PE. The cool part is that I can now where tennis-shoes to school.

tsk tsk CJ you're better than this.

CJSchneider 09-22-2012 02:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by raiderz4life (Post 3124136)
tsk tsk CJ you're better than this.

Don't correct me. I teach P.E. now.


Take two laps, smart guy.

Raiderz4Life 09-22-2012 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CJSchneider (Post 3124141)
Don't correct me. I teach P.E. now.


Take two laps, smart guy.

How bout robotics hu??

Does 0001100 mean the same as 1110011???

CJSchneider 09-22-2012 02:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by raiderz4life (Post 3124144)
How bout robotics hu??

Does 0001100 mean the same as 1110011???

Do you really want me to cuss you out in binary?


01000010011001010110001101100001011101010111001101 10010100100000011010010110011000100000011100110110 11110010110000100000011110010110111101110101001000 00011000110110000101101110001000000110101101101001 01110011011100110010000001101101011110010010000001 10100001100001011010010111001001111001001000000111 01110110100001101001011101000110010100100000011000 01011100110111001100101110

Nalej 09-22-2012 06:46 PM

That.Just.Happened.

Cigaro 09-22-2012 07:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brent (Post 3124342)
Get this:

If you are only able to get Time Warner service for internet at your apartment complex, like me, and you do not have any sort of TV service, you cannot access ESPN3 because Time Warner is a ****** company.

So, does any one here have a reliable workaround?

Are you committed to watching ESPN3, or just any available online stream? First Row Sports would accomplish the latter.


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