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Old 08-30-2010, 08:33 PM    (permalink
Paranoidmoonduck
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Originally Posted by BeerBaron View Post
Really? I can't remember who all was on it, but I saw a list of former Tedford coached QBs about 6 or 7 names long of which Rodgers is the only one remotely successful. Joey Harrington was definitely one of the bigger failures on it.
There's 6 1st round quarterbacks, I believe.

Trent Dilfer (drafted 1994) - Tedford was there for three years of Dilfer's college career
I'm going to refrain from saying much here, because I never saw him in college and my biggest impression of seeing him is leading that Baltimore offense. He wasn't great, wasn't terrible, but it wasn't like he was a supremely talented player who underachieved.

Akili Smith (drafted 1999) - Tedford was there for his senior year
I really don't think you can lay this at the feet of Tedford. The Bengals didn't do their due diligence with Smith. There's tons of evidence out there that if they had simply asked the majority of the Oregon staff what they thought of Smith, they would have figured out he was a terrible pick that high.

Joey Harrington (drafted 2002) - Tedford was there for three years of his career
Maybe it was just a mental thing with Harrington. In his defense, he actually was pretty far from terrible for a terrible team. I just don't think he had the mentality to stick in the league for a long career.

David Carr (drafted 2002) - Tedford was there for his freshman year
This one shouldn't even get mentioned. Tedford was gone before Carr was a sophomore and none of Carr's problems (low release, not getting rid of the ball, etc.) are even slightly what Tedford preaches.

Kyle Boller (drafted 2003) - Tedford was there for his senior year
Let's be honest, Boller was a product of draft hype. He had never even completed over 50% of his passes in a season before Tedford came along, and while Tedford reformed his throwing motion enough to get him be mildly productive, Boller was picked high because he was an athlete, not because he deserved to.

Aaron Rodgers (drafted 2005) - Tedford hand-picked him and was there for his entire college career
This is the one guy who where it's clear he was Tedford's guy all along. At the time, everyone was referencing Tedford as a concern without actually saying what specifically the issue was. Tedford runs a simple offense compared to the NFL, but so does every single other coach. He asks that his quarterbacks carry the ball high and get rid of it quickly, but that's hardly a negative. Obviously, Rodgers carries the ball lower now, but you can still see the signs of Tedford's mechanical teaching in the way he plays. Rodgers was obviously smart, confident, and crazy accurate. Anyone remember him completing 26 straight passes in LA against USC the year after beating them in triple overtime (as a sophomore)? To say that Rodgers and Tedford were unfairly tagged is an understatement.

If we limit the list to guys that Tedford coached for more than a single season, we're left with Trent Dilfer (an average starter who won a Superbowl), Joey Harrington (who struggled for the worst team in football), and Aaron Rodgers (who's been a huge success). There's not even close to enough there to constitute a trend, either positive or negative.
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Old 08-30-2010, 10:27 PM    (permalink
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Originally Posted by Paranoidmoonduck View Post
There's 6 1st round quarterbacks, I believe.

Trent Dilfer (drafted 1994) - Tedford was there for three years of Dilfer's college career
I'm going to refrain from saying much here, because I never saw him in college and my biggest impression of seeing him is leading that Baltimore offense. He wasn't great, wasn't terrible, but it wasn't like he was a supremely talented player who underachieved.

Akili Smith (drafted 1999) - Tedford was there for his senior year
I really don't think you can lay this at the feet of Tedford. The Bengals didn't do their due diligence with Smith. There's tons of evidence out there that if they had simply asked the majority of the Oregon staff what they thought of Smith, they would have figured out he was a terrible pick that high.

Joey Harrington (drafted 2002) - Tedford was there for three years of his career
Maybe it was just a mental thing with Harrington. In his defense, he actually was pretty far from terrible for a terrible team. I just don't think he had the mentality to stick in the league for a long career.

David Carr (drafted 2002) - Tedford was there for his freshman year
This one shouldn't even get mentioned. Tedford was gone before Carr was a sophomore and none of Carr's problems (low release, not getting rid of the ball, etc.) are even slightly what Tedford preaches.

Kyle Boller (drafted 2003) - Tedford was there for his senior year
Let's be honest, Boller was a product of draft hype. He had never even completed over 50% of his passes in a season before Tedford came along, and while Tedford reformed his throwing motion enough to get him be mildly productive, Boller was picked high because he was an athlete, not because he deserved to.

Aaron Rodgers (drafted 2005) - Tedford hand-picked him and was there for his entire college career
This is the one guy who where it's clear he was Tedford's guy all along. At the time, everyone was referencing Tedford as a concern without actually saying what specifically the issue was. Tedford runs a simple offense compared to the NFL, but so does every single other coach. He asks that his quarterbacks carry the ball high and get rid of it quickly, but that's hardly a negative. Obviously, Rodgers carries the ball lower now, but you can still see the signs of Tedford's mechanical teaching in the way he plays. Rodgers was obviously smart, confident, and crazy accurate. Anyone remember him completing 26 straight passes in LA against USC the year after beating them in triple overtime (as a sophomore)? To say that Rodgers and Tedford were unfairly tagged is an understatement.

If we limit the list to guys that Tedford coached for more than a single season, we're left with Trent Dilfer (an average starter who won a Superbowl), Joey Harrington (who struggled for the worst team in football), and Aaron Rodgers (who's been a huge success). There's not even close to enough there to constitute a trend, either positive or negative.
As is the case with most guys who get lumped into a "system" argument. There's such a small sample size of guys picked that high from a gimmick offense/system/whatever you want to call it that it's completely unfair to say whether the system was the cause of their failure. Usually, it just comes down to teams not doing their due diligence while scouting. I'm sure if somebody crunched the numbers, players from "traditional/pro style" offenses bust at a similar rate as "system" guys. There's just so many more of them to judge from which leads to the perception that they've got a better rate of success.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PMD
Tedford runs a simple offense compared to the NFL, but so does every single other coach.
I completely agree with this, 100%. College offenses (and defenses) are so much more simple than NFL ones that guys who come from pro style offenses generally only beat the learning curve in terms of their footwork in the running game and in their drops. The passing game is so different on so many levels that the advantage of a being in a traditional offense is negligible at best.

Truth be told, I think we need to eliminate the term "pro style offense" from scouting jargon. There is no pro style offense in college. There are traditional offenses, sure, but nobody is running pro offenses in college with a six hour practice limit every week.
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